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Equally shared parenting and custody movement gaining momentum

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The determination of child custody can be a hotly contested issue after a couple goes through a divorce. Many times, joint custody is granted which often leaves one parent with only one weeknight and every other weekend with their child. The structuring of a joint custody arrangement is typically based on economic resources, which may leave a much needed parent with little time with his child.

A new movement is underway throughout the U.S. to raise awareness about equally shared parenting and is attempting to make it a reality. A Massachusetts organization, known as Leading Women for Shared Parenting, is spearheading the campaign in an effort to give children the benefits of having both parents equally present in the child's life. Supporters of the program point to a study conducted by Arizona State University showing both men and women support equal parenting arrangements. Though the movement is relatively new, it is quickly gaining momentum throughout the country. State laws are slow in reacting to the grassroots push, but supporters are confident that changes will be made.

Until that time, problems in the realm of family law will continue to be complex. Depending on the facts and the parties involved, a dispute regarding child custody can be easily negotiated or fiercely contested during a court hearing. A family law attorney may be able to help a recently divorced couple come to terms and settle their family legal issues. If a mutual agreement is not possible, then an experienced attorney can help fight for what is in the best interests of the parents and the child.

An equal parenting arrangement may be best for a child post-divorce. Yet, until parents agree to these arrangements and courts support them, they will not be very common. So, until then, parents must do what they can to make their child's life as best as possible.

Source: The Star-Tribune, "Rosenblum: Divorced dads get big gift from fired-up moms," Gail Rosenblum, Jun. 8, 2013