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Columbus Short ordered to pay hefty child support obligation

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Parents who get divorced have a whole host of legal issues to address. From alimony and property division to child custody and child support issues, these individuals can often find themselves amidst a brutal legal fight. However, when it comes to issues that affect a couple's children, it is helpful to remember that the matter should be settled in a way that supports the best interests of the children involved. An agreement on these issues can be reached amongst the parents, but, as can be seen in a recent celebrity's case, if an agreement cannot be reached then a judge will make a final determination.

Columbus Short, an actor best known for his work on the show "Scandal," recently failed to show up to a court hearing where alimony and child support was determined. The actor has not responded to his estranged wife's divorce petition. As a result, a judge awarded Short's ex-wife $17,000 in alimony and more than $4,500 a month in child support. This latter amount should go a long way toward helping the mother care for the couple's two children. Short, who has been let go from "Scandal," claims he has faced economic hardship after facing legal problems resulting from a bar fight in which he injured another man.

Tackling a child support issue can be difficult for Arizonans. Though the Arizona child support guidelines base the payment amount on the number of children involved and each parent's income, parents may elect to negotiate a different amount. An attorney can help with this process, working to ensure the best interests of the children are protected.

On the other hand, a child support judgment is not final until the end of time. Instead, a parent who faces economic hardship caused by unemployment or the onset of a medical condition may be able to obtain a child support modification. This may lower a parent's payment obligation while keeping him or her out of legal trouble. No matter which side a parent finds himself or herself, it is often best to have the support of a legal professional.

Source: BET, "Columbus Short Slammed With Huge Child Support Payment," Evelyn Diaz, Jun. 26, 2014

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